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Crummock Water

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Crummock Water is located between Buttermere to the south and Loweswater to the north. The lake is 2.5 miles long, 0.6 miles wide and 140 feet deep. The River Cocker is considered to start at the north of the lake, before then flowing into Lorton Vale. The hill of Mellbreak runs the full length of the lake on its western side; as Alfred Wainwright described it: "no pairing of hill and lake in Lakeland have a closer partnership than these". The meaning of 'Crummock' is 'Crooked one'. The lake is owned by the National Trust. /> BUY THIS PHOTO Crummock Water

Clints Quarry Nature Reserve

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Clints Quarry is a former Carboniferous limestone quarry near Woodend in West Cumbria. It's a fascinating place not only for wildlife, but also for geology and industrial archaeology. In the 1600's the limestone rock was used for building and agriculture, and more recently in the local steel-making industry, until quarrying finally ceased in 1930. In 1984, Clints Quarry nature reserve was purchased from British Steel and Lord Egremont. Damp conditions between the spoil heaps are ideal places to find northern marsh and common spotted orchid. Explore the drier slopes of the spoil heaps to find wild strawberry, ox-eye daisy, centaury, mouse-eared hawkweed, bird’s-foot trefoil and knapweed. You can find bee and pyramidal orchids here too. This sheltered quarry provides with its profusion of flowers and grasses is an ideal habitat for butterflies. Throughout the summer on sunny days you can find common blue butterflies, orange tip, gatekeeper, ringlet, and meadow brown butterflies.

Saint Bees

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St Bees is a historic town on the west coast of Cumbria, on the Irish Sea. St Bees is a popular holiday destination due to the coastline and proximity to the Western Lake District. In the village there is the Norman St Bees Priory dating from 1120, and St Bees School founded in 1583. The Wainwright Coast to Coast Walk starts from St Bees and the National Trail, the England Coast Path, runs along the coast. The village is served by the Cumbrian Coast Railway. The priory had a great influence on the area. The monks worked the land, fished, and extended the priory buildings. The ecclesiastical parish of St Bees was large and stretched to Ennerdale, Loweswater, Wasdale and Eskdale. The coffin routes from these outlying areas to the mother church in St Bees can still be followed in places. The priory was closed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries on the orders of Henry VIII in 1539. The nave and transepts of the monastic church have continued in use as the parish church to the present

Southern Marsh Orchid

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The Southern Marsh Orchid appears from May to July, with various shades of purple and variable markings. The species can be found across Europe, and is found close to water, in damp alkaline meadows, by ponds, lakes or reservoirs and in dune slacks. The flowers of this species are pollinated by insects including the cuckoo bee and skipper butterfly. This shot was captured close to the Cleator Moor Activity Centre. Southern Marsh Orchid

Namaste

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Hello.  I'm a northern fella, grounded in the UK's Lake District. I love the outdoors, photography, and local history. I was born 968 years into the second millennium of the anno Domini, which coincidentally was also the Year of the Monkey. I live between the sea, mountains and lakes of Cumbria. I've always lived here and couldn't contemplate being anywhere else. It's a gorgeous part of the world. I've opted for a basic design for this blog, and threw in some magic to make it blazingly fast. In the main, I'll be posting photos of the local area, but random shite will also be thrown in from time to time - an eclectic mix drawn from my mind. It will undoubtedly be a mess! Anyways. Enjoy your visit, and please do call back soon...

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