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A year in sport (2021)

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At the beginning of 2021, I had one New Year resolution. It was to run more this year, than the previous. I'm fairly new to running. I took it up in  February 2020 , with the Couch to 5K running plan. Previously, I would avoid any sport. Getting out of breath wasn't my idea of fun. I love it now.  So, how did I do in 2021? I ran a total of 414 miles (to date), with a total elevation of 17,925 feet. During the year, I broke 24 personal records in my quest to get fitter.  April was my busiest month of the year, with 66 miles run. This equated to 19 hours for the month - 99 for the year. In 2021, I was active for 110 days, the previous year, 106. My first sub 30 minute 5K run occured on 3rd August, with a time of 29:57. I was staggered at my achievement and couldn't stop grinning for hours afterwards.  I'm really pleased at my progression When I first started running in February 2020, I never dreamed of running a full 5K (3.1mi), never mind a 10K (6

Nannycatch to the Solway

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This is the view from Cold Fell/Blakely Raise in the Western Lake District. To the left the scene is the side of Dent Fell. To the right is Flat Fell. The footpath meandering through the centre of the valley takes the walker to along Nannycatch Road. In the distance, the towns of Cleator Moor, Whitehaven and Workington can be made out. Then the Solway Firth cuts across the scene from left to right, with the Mountains of Scotland on the horizon. The Solway Firth* is a firth that forms part of the border between England and Scotland, between Cumbria (including the Solway Plain) and Dumfries and Galloway. It stretches from St Bees Head, to the Mull of Galloway, on the western end of Dumfries and Galloway. The firth comprises part of the Irish Sea. *Firth is a word in the English and Scots languages used to denote various coastal waters in the United Kingdom, predominantly within Scotland. It is linguistically cognate to fjord - a long, narrow inlet with steep sides or cliffs, created by a

Croasdale to Ennerdale

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Heading towards Croasdale in West Cumbria, along Cauda Brow, magnificent views of the Ennerdale fells open up. A photo doesn't really do the scene justice. You have to be there to experience the vista. The incline of Cauda Brow makes it a popular route for local cyclists (so please drive with caution). In my opinion, those finding fun in riding up a 266 metre hill, with 15.5% gradient must be nuts. Lol.  Croasdale is a hamlet, comprising a farm and a handful of properties, in the parish of Ennerdale and Kinniside. The Ennerdale valley, around Ennerdale Lake, contains one of the largest forests in Cumbria, and has more than 20 miles of forest road, and many other paths open to the public. />  BUY THIS PHOTO Croasdale to Ennerdale

A Return To Cycling

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Today, I ventured out for bicycle ride for the first time in 20 years on a second-hand mountain bike. It was quite enjoyable.  Being fairly fit (running an average of 12 miles per week), the route I'd set myself wasn't too daunting at 11 miles. I just hadn't accounted for a 600ft (183m) ascent. It was hard going at times, but I completed the ride within the 90 minutes I'd set myself. I've learned a couple of things: 1) I need a new bike - the one I have is too small. However, I won't jump in straight away and splash the cash because this could be a short-lived fad of mine.  2) Riding a bike hurts my arse. Padded cycle shorts could help, but an aversion to looking ridiculous means that I'll just have to grin and bare it until my backside overcomes the pain - a pain which did cause me to walk the final 500 yards home.  As I progress, I'll be trying to compliment my running with a ride on recovery days. Doing so, should help improve my cardiovascular fitnes

Cogra Moss

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Cogra Moss is a wonderful enclosed forest surrounding a reservoir which is now used by the Cockermouth Angling Association. The walk up to the dam is along surfaced tracks. Beyond the dam a number of unsurfaced paths provide the visitor great access around the reservoir in a loop. Cogra Moss is an artificial water retained by a substantial dam across Rakegill Beck, created as a reservoir about 1880, and discontinued as a public water supply in 1975. It has a pleasant setting surrounded on three sides by Forestry Commission planting on Lamplugh Fell and Knock Murton. /> BUY THIS PHOTO Cogra Moss

River Liza

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The River Liza flows through the wonderfully remote Ennerdale Valley. The river spawns Trout, Salmon, Char, among others. The name of the Liza derives from old Norse, conferring a meaning of "light (or shining) river". The Liza is one of England's most natural rivers. From its source under the majestic peak of Great Gable the river flows through a glacial landscape past the iconic Blacksail Youth Hostel. Constantly eroding new routes it flows through the heart of the big forest before calmly entering Ennerdale Water. The river is subject to the Wild Ennerdale Project which aims to introduce more wildlife to the Ennerdale Valley. The Wild Ennerdale Project uses a policy similar to managed retreat which means the river is subject to no human interference or maintenance such as dredging, straightening or even flood defences. /> BUY THIS PHOTO River Liza, Ennerdale

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A year in sport (2021)

Nannycatch to the Solway

Croasdale to Ennerdale